Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Sunday, November 30. [Chattanooga] —Called on Mrs. Newsom this afternoon; had a long talk over our hospital trials. She related some of the hospital scenes at Bowling Green, which were truly awful—Corinth was heaven in comparison. I met Major Richmond there, one of General Polk’s aids. He is a fine-looking man, and very intelligent, with all the suavity of manner characteristic of the southern gentleman. He has traveled much, and related a number of anecdotes of scenes on the continent of Europe; told some few of England and Englishmen, and seemed to judge the whole, as many others have done, both in this country and the old, by the little he had seen, a mistake we are all liable to fall into. On the whole, his conversation was very interesting.

Dr. Hunter has gone on a visit to Mississippi; Dr. Abernethy of Tennessee has taken his place. We have a nice old negro man belonging to the latter, who cooks for us. We get a good deal of money now, as the hospitals are out of debt. Some days we have as many as seven hundred patients; not more than one half of them are confined to bed.

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A Diary of American Events.

The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore

November 30.—A skirmish took place near Abbeville, Miss., between a reconnoitring force of Union troops under the command of Colonel Lee, and the strong body of rebels, resulting in a retreat of the latter to their fortifications at Abbeville, with some loss. Not a man of the Union party was injured.

—An expedition to Yellville, Ark., by the First Iowa, Tenth Illinois, and Second Wisconsin regiments, under command of Colonel Dudley Wickersham, returned to General Herron’s camp, having been successful in destroying portions of the rebel saltpetre-works, arsenal, and store-houses, with about five hundred shot-guns and rifles.— General Curtis’s Detpatch.

—A rumor was prevalent in Washington, that a proposition for an armistice of thirty days was made by the rebel government, and that General Robert E. Lee was in that place negotiating the terms.—The Forty-seventh regiment of Massachusetts troops, under the command of Colonel Marsh, left Boston for the seat of war.—An expedition to Hyde County, N. C, under the command of Major Garrard of the Third New-York cavalry, returned to Newbern, having thoroughly destroyed all the bridges in that vicinity, besides capturing Colonel Carter, of the Thirteenth North Carolina volunteers, and a rebel sergeant belonging to the Fourth North-Carolina confederate troops.—George P. Kane, late Marshal of Baltimore, Md., issued an address to his fellow-citizens of the State of Maryland, setting forth a statement relative to his incarceration at Fort Warren, Mass. —The schooner Levi Rowe, while attempting to run the blockade of Wilmington, N. C, was captured by the steamer Mount Vernon.—The bark Parker Cook was captured and destroyed, in the Mona Passage, by the rebel steamer Alabama.

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Extortion.

Civil War

Dallas Herald (Texas), November 29, 1862

We are informed by a reliable gentleman direct from Kemper’s Bluff, Victoria county, that Messrs. Graves and Milton, of that place, are selling goods of every description brought from Mexico, at from 100 to 300 per cent. cheaper than the merchants of this city. Fine Casimer for pantaloons sells there for ten dollars a pattern—here at $22. Calico at 60 cents there—at $1 25 here. Ladies hoops at six dollars there—here at $25, and boots and shoes at the same comparative rates. One establishment in particular in this city, that is selling for the above extortionary prices, procured their goods and started with them at the same time with Messrs. Graves & Milton, and there is no reason why the former should sell higher than the latter. Let them be gratefully remembered!—Ibid. (S. A. Herald)

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Diary of a Southern Refugee, Judith White McGuire.

Diary of a Southern Refugee During the War by Judith White McGuire

29th.—Nothing of importance from the army. The people of Fredericksburg suffering greatly from the sudden move. I know a family, accustomed to every luxury at home, now in a damp basement-room in Richmond. The mother and three young daughters cooking, washing, etc.; the father, a merchant, is sick and cut off from business, friends, and every thing else. Another family, consisting of mother and four daughters, in one room, supported by the work of one of the daughters who has an office in the Note-Signing Department. To keep starvation from the house is all that they can do; their supplies in Fredericksburg can’t be brought to them—no transportation. I cannot mention the numbers who are similarly situated; the country is filled with them. Country houses, as usual, show a marvellous degree of elasticity. A small house accommodating any number who may apply; pallets spread on the floor; every sofa and couch sheeted for visitors of whom they never heard before. If the city people would do more in that way, there would be less suffering. Every cottage in this village is full; and now families are looking with wistful eyes at the ball-room belonging to the hotel, which, it seems to me, might be partitioned off to accommodate several families. The billiard-rooms are taken, it is said, though not yet occupied. But how everybody is to be supported is a difficult question to decide. Luxuries have been given up long ago, by many persons. Coffee is $4 per pound, and good tea from $18 to $20; butter ranges from $1.50 to $2 per pound; lard 50 cents; corn $15 per barrel; and wheat $4.50 per bushel. We can’t get a muslin dress for less than $6 or $8 per yard; calico $1.15, etc. This last is no great hardship, for we will all resort to homespun. We are knitting our own stockings, and regret that we did not learn to spin and weave. The North Carolina homespun is exceedingly pretty, and makes a genteel dress; the only difficulty is in the dye; the colours are pretty, but we have not learned the art of setting the wood colours; but we are improving in that art too, and when the first dye fades, we can dip them again in the dye.

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Three Years in the Confederate Horse Artillery — George Michael Neese.

Three Years in the Confederate Horse Artillery — George Michael Neese.

November 29 — I had some Yankee prisoners in charge last night. This afternoon an alarm reached camp that the Yankees were advancing on Winchester. We were immediately ordered to pack up our all and load it on the wagons, then we were ordered with the battery east of Winchester, on the Berryville pike, at the eastern outskirts of Winchester. The Maryland Line of infantry formed a line of battle on the south side of the pike, right opposite our battery. After we were in battle line an hour or so, and everything had settled down to the quiet hush of stilly night, the Maryland Line struck up and sang a lively and sentimental, yet pathetic song — “Annie Lyle.” It was well rendered. The deep, rich, full, round bass voices blended harmoniously with the clear and flowing tenors, and the spoken melody that floated on the frosty night air was as delightful and agreeable to the ear as the whisperings of an evening wind when it breathes its vesper hymn for dying day. There is a charm and an inspiration about music,— even in a simple song,— that those that have never heard it steal along a battle line in the silent watches of the night cannot comprehend the fullness of its enrapturing and inspiring influences. When the alarm reached Winchester that the Yankees were coming it caused great excitement among the citizens. When we passed through town toward the Berryville road, where it was reported that the enemy was approaching, the town was all in a stirred-up bustle. Men were running to and fro on the streets. Some of them looked and acted as if they would like to pick up the town and move it deeper into Dixie. The Yankees did not advance to-night, and when we came back to camp, which was nearly at midnight, all the excitement in town had died away. The streets were dark and silent save the sound of the steady tread of the soldier and the rumbling of artillery wheels. The city was asleep.

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Downing’s Civil War Diary.–Alexander G. Downing.

Diary of Alexander G. Downing; Company E, Eleventh Iowa Infantry

Saturday, 29th—We started this morning at 6 o’clock and arrived at Holly Springs at 10 o’clock. We remained there about two hours and then moved on to Waterford, eight miles distant, where we went into camp. We drove the rebels before us nearly all day and there was some skirmishing. The fighting in the streets of Waterford was sharp and the buildings were burned. There was heavy cannonading in the front late in the day. There are thousands of negroes, women and children, of all shades of color gathered at Holly Springs. The roads by which we marched were lined with them. The best of the negro men have been taken South by the rebels to work on their fortifications.

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War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

Saturday, 29th. Other brigades returned to Cane Hill, where we had been retained as reserve. Our brigade was ordered back to Rhea’s Mills. Moved back and camped north of the mill. Got the mail from the train just arrived. Six letters, two from Fannie, 3 from home and 1 from Will. Happy boy. Several papers.

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An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones.

An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 6th Battery, Wisconsin Artillery.

Holly Springs, Miss., Saturday, Nov. 29. The bugle’s notes awoke me in the same position as that I fell asleep in three hours before. Prepared for march and started with the sun, in advance of the artillery; passed through Holly Springs about 11 A. M.; passed through the streets where twenty-four hours before the last of the rebels skedaddled. Holly Springs passed my expectations in size and beauty, being the largest place I have seen in Secession.

We traveled on in a southward course towards Waterford. General Hamilton and troupe passed us about 4 miles beyond Holly Springs. Two miles farther on we heard two guns discharged and heard rumors of a battle ahead. On the brow of a hill we were shown the grounds where the cavalry were engaged in the morning with the Rebs’ pickets, killing a Michigan boy and three Rebs. Ascended the hill which overlooked Waterford, consisting of a mill and a small creek, branch of Coldwater River. Here the enemy opened fire on our troops in the morning with two pieces which were taken. We forded the stream about 5 P. M., went into camp on the banks, got some flour from the mills (ground by the secesh for supper), and laid down under the gun on soil twenty-four hours ago occupied by Rebs, seven miles south of Holly Springs.

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The Color Guard, A Corporal’s Notes, James Kendall Hosmer.

The Color Guard, A Corporal’s Notes, James Kendall Hosmer

Nov. 29. — This is the steamer “Illinois,” in the stream, about half a mile off the Battery. The ship is preparing to sail. Evening; and by special courtesy, the surgeon being absent, I am invited to sleep in his berth to-night. No slight favor, you folks whose sheets are clean, to have a mattress softer than an oaken-deck plank; and a place to lay one’s head, sweeter than a bundle of old rope, soiled by the muddy feet of a trampling army. I stand up, portfolio in hand, half sitting, half leaning, against the cabin-table, with back toward the dim light. A throng of officers are writing, talking, and hurrying past. Now I am luckier: I have found a stool under a brighter light, and the cleanest and best place I have had to write my journal in since I began it.

Yesterday we marched to Brooklyn; then went off through lanterned vessels at dusk, past the glowing city, until at last the “Illinois” threw over us the shadow of her black hull and double stacks. We waited an hour in the cold, on the lighter; then another on the open deck, among the gun-carriages of a battery that was going with us. We were suffered at last to crowd into the cabin, all grumblers. Ed. could hardly make himself heard, though his lungs are good.

The wrath of the regiment vented itself in every form, — the oath, the deprecation, the remonstrance. Tom Barker fairly blued the air about him with vocal brimstone and sulphur, — a most accomplished and full-lunged blasphemer. From him, there was every gradation down to a little fellow who remonstrated with a gentle spill of milk and water.

Camp down, soldiers, where you can! This cabin is stripped of furniture and carpet: a mirror and the white paint are the only things to remind one of the old elegance of the packet. I glance at the glass as we crowd in. Which am I among the bearded, blue-coated, hustling men? I hardly know myself, sunburnt and muddied; the “52,” on the cap top, showing out in the lantern light. Sergt. Warriner, of Company A, — gentlemanly fellow, —left guide, whose elbow rubs mine at battalion-drill, offers me a place in a “bunk” he has found empty in one of the staterooms. Bias Dickinson, my wise and jovial file-leader, bunks over me. There is room for another: so I go out to where McGill is wedged into the crowding mass, and extract him as I would a tooth. Gradually the hubbub is quelled. The mass of men, like a river seeking its level, flows into “bunk” and stateroom, cabin and galley. Then the floors are covered, and a few miserable ones hold on to banisters and table-legs, and at last the regiment swears itself into an uncomfortable sleep.

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Rebel War Clerk

A Rebel War Clerk’s Diary at the Confederate States Capital, By John Beauchamp Jones

NOVEMBER 29TH.—The Quartermaster-General publishes a notice that he will receive and distribute contributions of clothing, etc. to the army, and even pay for the shirts $1 each! Shirts are selling at $12. The people will not trust him to convey the clothing to their sons and brothers, and so the army must suffer on. But he is getting in bad odor. A gentleman in Alabama writes that his agents are speculating in food: the President tells the Secretary to demand explanations, and the Secretary does so. Col. Myers fails, I think, to make the exhibit required, and it may be the worse for him.

I see by the papers that another of Gen. Winder’s police has escaped to Washington City, and is now acting as a Federal detective. And yet many similar traitors are retained in service here!

The Governor of North Carolina writes the President that his State intends to organize an army of 10,000 men for its own defense, besides her sixty regiments in the Confederate States service; and asks if the Confederate States Government can furnish any arms, etc. The President sends this to the Secretary of War, for his advice. He wants to know Mr. Seddon’s views on the subject—a delicate and embarrassing predicament for the new Secretary, truly! He must know that the President frowns on all military organizations not under his own control, and that he counteracted all Gen. Floyd’s efforts to raise a division under State authority. Beware, Mr. Seddon! The President is a little particular concerning his prerogatives; and by the advice you now give, you stand or fall. What is North Carolina to the Empire? You tread on dangerous ground. Forget your old State-Rights doctrine, or off goes your head.

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A Diary of American Events.

The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore

November 29.—The steamer Star was captured and burned by guerrillas at a point about two miles below Plaquemine, La. This morning the Star went up as high as Plaquemine; she soon left, and came down about a mile, when she landed and took in forty-five hogsheads of sugar; after which she crossed over to the left bank, at a wood-pile about another mile lower down, to take in wood. She had not got more than a cord when she was surprised by a gang of guerrillas, who took possession of her and moved her to the opposite side of the river, and after rolling out about thirty hogsheads of sugar, set her on fire. Captain McKiege and the engineer, William Dewey, were detained as prisoners, but the rest of the crew were given their liberty.—New-Orleans Delta, December 2.

—A skirmish occurred between a scouting-party from Captain Mear’s Maryland Home Guard, stationed at Berlin, and a body of Bob White’s rebel cavalry, in which the latter were put to flight with a loss of two men.—General Curtis, at St. Louis, Mo., reported to the War Department at Washington, that a cavalry expedition, under Major Torry, to the forks of the Mingo and St. Francis Rivers, had captured Colonel Phelan and ten men of the rebel army.

—The Savannah Republican says that “the people of Charleston, S. C, have pulled up their lead pipes and contributed sixty thousand pounds to the government, and that the government will issue receipts for all lead pipes and other fixtures, and binds itself to replace them at the end of the war.”—The advance column of the Union army under General Grant, passed through Holly Springs, Miss., this morning.—(Doc. 55.)

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Civil War Diary of Charles H. Lynch

Civil War Diary of Charles H. Lynch, 18th Conn. Vol’s.

Our duty at Camp Emory was not very laborious. Allowed to visit the city quite often on passes. After Sunday morning inspection no more duty required of us until dress parade. Guard duty must be done all the time.

November. The most important event was our first Thanksgiving in camp. Passed very pleasantly. A good dinner, with games of foot and base-ball. The day closing with dress parade. Many visitors from Baltimore and some from Connecticut. The weather during November was very fine for camp life. Barracks were built for winter quarters to take the place of tents.

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Robert M. Magill—Personal Reminiscences of a Confederate Soldier Boy.

Robert M. Magill—Personal Reminiscences of a Confederate Soldier Boy, 39th Georgia Regiment of Infantry

Friday, 28th.—Marched to Manchester to-day through very poor country. Camped at Duck River.

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Fredericksburg

Civil War

Charleston Mercury, November 28, 1862

Richmond, Monday, November 24.

Burnside still delays the destruction of Fredericksburg. Nothing from there this morning. It was a sad scene at the Depot, Saturday night, when the refugees arrived. Women and children, who had been huddled in box and cattle cars, were found far off from the Depot, seated or standing in the night air, utterly at a loss what to do, or where to go. Will not this needless suffering be requited unto the Abolitionists? . . . Hermes.

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Downing’s Civil War Diary.–Alexander G. Downing.

Diary of Alexander G. Downing; Company E, Eleventh Iowa Infantry

Friday, 28th—We packed our knapsacks ready to be sent to La Grange, and striking our tents started at 6 o’clock. We marched eighteen miles and went into camp for the night. Our cavalry drove some five hundred rebels out of Holly Springs this morning. The entire army is on the move and is in command of General Grant. It is reported that we are to effect a junction with General Sherman’s army in the rear of Vicksburg.

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War Letters of William Thompson Lusk.

War Letters of William Thompson Lusk.

(W. W. Phelps To W. T. Lusk)

Nov. 28th, Evening.

My dear Will:

The end of a day marked by the alternation of joy with sorrow in an extreme degree. This morning the Postman gave me a large envelope covered with postage stamps, and marked with the seal of the State. It contained two papers — the one in a large envelope with the same seal upon its face and the superscription Major W. T. Lusk; the other, the letter explanatory from the Gov.’s Secretary, which I enclose.

You can imagine my gratification — the labor of months rewarded and the suspense ended. I made it a holiday.

Your Uncle, who had travailed with me, should rejoice over the birth. Down I rattled in the omnibus, with that beautiful Commission in my pocket — surest of the sure, for hadn’t I it in black and white and on parchment? I could tell any one, but, except Nelly and our folks who were rejoicing over it at home, Mr. I. N.[1] should be the first.

I left the omnibus at the Post-Office, where I dropped in a letter to tell your mother that I had a Commission, in which the Commonwealth of N. Y. declared that for the confidence it had in him, her son was declared Major of the 79th. From the Post briskly to 45 Wall, where your Uncle and I re-read the Commission, shook hands and laughed over the accomplishment of well-laid schemes. Mr. Stillman was still off for Thanksgiving, so we had the office to ourselves.

Finally I tore myself away and went with Commission and a light heart to my desk at Judge Woodruffs. Young Woodruff read the Commission, congratulated me and floored me with a telegraphic despatch. I felt it in my boots as soon as “the words” (vide Homer) “escaped the hedje of his teeth,” that here was a fall to Pride. And so it was, and a happy day received a most gloomy end.

The Despatch told me to send back the Commission— that Capt. More must have it — that Capt. Lusk had recommended the appointment. I saw our Postmaster and told him to recall your mother’s letter if possible. I broke the joy of your Uncle, who was telling Mr. Brady with glee of his nephew’s promotion, and longed for bedtime that I might cease to think of the disappointment of human hopes.

I don’t see how you could well help signing, but if you had only had the courage to rely on our watchfulness and refuse! But it’s too late now. Your Uncle and I have only this melancholy consideration to console us — that we have spread your fame. Your name is as familiar as household words to Mr. A. T. Stewart, who wrote for your Uncle the strongest of letters, to Gen. Wetmore, to Mr. Opdyke and hosts of solid men, who could tell your story from Bull Run down, as well as I.

Never mind, Will, your disappointment cannot be any greater than mine, who carried “Major Lusk’s” Commission for six hours and had to return it.

Only next time, if your friends have worked and provided for every contingency except that, don’t sign away your chances by recommending another for the place they seek.

All well. Your mother comes down Monday to live with Lilly.

In haste, most affec’y.,

Walter.


[1] Isaac N. Phelps.

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Diary and Letters of Rutherford B. Hayes.

Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes

Gallipolis, November 28, 1862 (P. M.)

Dearest: — Had a nice trip up the river. All accounts from the Twenty-third seem favorable for a tolerably decent winter. I go up in the morning. Met Captain Hood here. He goes up with me, also two or three soldiers.

Mr. French and eight men in hospital, all glad to see me. I wished you were with me on the way.

Love to all the boys and Grandma. Write often. With much love.

Yours,

R.

Mrs. Hayes.

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War Letters of William Thompson Lusk.

War Letters of William Thompson Lusk.

(W. W. Phelps To E. F. Lusk)

New-York, Nov. 28th, 1862.

My dear Mrs. Lusk:

You will rejoice with me on hearing that the Postman has just brought me a large envelope stamped with the State Seal, containing a Commission for Major W. T. Lusk! Hurrah! And Hurrah a second time, because I was too much for his honor, Lt.-Col. Morrison!

I surmised he would play Will a shabby trick and recommend another, and I was ready for him. I wrote to the Gov.’s secretary that he might nominate a fellow named More, but that Farnsworth, I was pretty sure, preferred Capt. Lusk. Sure enough! In Major Linsly’s letter enclosing the Commission, he tells me that Capt. More presented himself with Col. Morrison’s nomination, whereupon Major Linsly read my last letter to the Gov., in which I had anticipated the case, and the Gov. told him to send me the Commission for Capt. Lusk.

I write Will to-day, and send the Commission. I daren’t send the latter before I have advised Will, or Col. Morrison, through whose hands it goes, might venture to detain or destroy it.

With love of Nelly and me to Hunt and Mary,

Very truly,

Wm. Walter Phelps.

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War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

Friday, 28th. Started out at 5 as advance, but soon were ordered back, as rear guard. Division moved by another road. While at Rhea’s Mills we could hear the cannon roar. How aggravating. Moved on to Cane Hill. Learned that quite a battle had taken place there and on the mountain beyond. Went to a house and got some provisions. Built fires and rested, after some fresh pork and meal cakes.

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Letters and diary of Laura M. Towne.

Letters and diary of Laura M. Towne

Written from the Sea islands of South Carolina.

[Diary] November 28.

We have been wrapped all day in the smoke of battle and the people hear the roll of cannon. They say it is an attack upon Fort Pulaski. Perhaps it is now in the enemy’s hands. I hope not, but perhaps our folks were too busy junketing to take proper precautions. Nelly says many of the officers were shamefully drunk before the evening was over, and it is said that the rebel ram was in sight all day.

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An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones.

An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 6th Battery, Wisconsin Artillery.

Moscow, Friday, Nov. 28. Awoke before daylight with orders to prepare to march. All was ready by 6:30 A. M. Started at about 7:30, fell in rear of the column and marched toward Holly Springs; traveled all day with the exception of the necessary halts in the train. Passed through Early Grove 4 P. M., Hudsonville 7 P. M. Traveled until 9 P. M. Encamped near Coldwater River for the night. The country was all woodland except the cleared plantations; after dark the air was illumined, the raging fire caused by the dry leaves and fences, running for miles, it being set out by the advance. Came into park in a grove, made a “shebang” of shakes and laid down about 11:30 P. M.

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“A winter campaign here, by the way, is just impossible…”–Adams Family Letters, Charles Francis Adams, Jr., to his brother, John Quincy Adams II.

Adams Family Civil War letters; US Minister to the UK and his sons.

Potomac Bridge, Virginia
November 28, 1862

Here we are back with the Brigade at last. I hope you yesterday remembered us at home in your cups, for not a drop to drink, save water, had we, and our eating was of the toughest and slimmest. Here we are though, through mud and mire and rain, up with the army at last. A winter campaign here, by the way, is just impossible, no more and no less, and you who sit so snugly at home by the fire and round the hearth, and discuss our laziness in not pressing on, may as well dry up. We will allow everything to please you, waste of life, loss of labor, extreme exposure without tents, existence in a foodless country and all you will, and yet any movement is just simply impossible on account of mud. Horses can’t walk, artillery can’t be hauled, and ammunition can’t be carried through this country after this season. Of course, we don’t expect to get any forage, rations or tents through, but it is simply impossible to go ahead and carry the arms and ammunition to enable us to fight, though we should consent to starve and freeze cheerfully. So I look on it after the experience of a few days’ march. I may be wrong and hope I am. But Lord! how it vexes and amuses me to think how easy it is, after a full dinner, to sip your wine in the gas light, and look severely into a fine fire across the table, and criticise and find fault with us poor devils, at that very time preparing to lie down before our fires, mud to the middle, wet through, after a fine meal of hard bread and water, and with nothing between us and the sky but November clouds. I don’t complain of these little incidents of our life myself, and only I do wish they found less fault at home….

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Rebel War Clerk

A Rebel War Clerk’s Diary at the Confederate States Capital, By John Beauchamp Jones

NOVEMBER 28TH.—All is quiet on the Rappahannock; the enemy reported to be extending his line up the river some twenty miles, intending to find a passage. He might have come over last week but for a ruse of Gen. Lee, who appeared near Fredericksburg twenty-four hours in advance of the army. His presence deceived Burnside, who took it for granted that our general was at the head of his army!

M. Paul carried the day yesterday, in the Confederate Court, in the matter of $2,000,000 worth of tobacco, which, under pretense of its belonging to French citizens (though bought by Belmont, of New York, an alien enemy), is rescued from sequestration. In other words, the recognition of M. Paul as Consul, and the validity of his demands, deprives the Confederate Government of two millions; and really acknowledges the exequatur of the United States, as M. Paul is not Consul to the Confederate States but to the United States. This looks like submission; and a great fee has been realized by somebody. If the enemy were to take Richmond, this tobacco would be destroyed by the military.

Gen. Joseph E. Johnston is assigned to the command of the army of the West.

To-day we have a dispatch from Gov. Pettus, saying authority to pass cotton through the lines of the army, and for salt to have ingress, must be given immediately. The President directs the Secretary to transmit orders to the generals to that effect. He says the cotton is to go to France without touching any port in the possession of the enemy.

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A Diary of American Events.

The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore

November 28.—The battle of Cane Hill, Ark., was fought by the Union forces under General Blunt, and the rebel troops under the command of General Marmaduke, which resulted in a retreat of the latter with considerable loss.—(Doc. 34.)

—This morning, while doing picket-duty near Hartwood Church, about fifteen miles from Falmouth, Va., the first and third squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, belonging to General Averill’s brigade, were suddenly attacked by a numerically superior force of rebel cavalry, and after a brief resistance, in which four of the Unionists were killed and nine wounded, were finally taken prisoners.

—An important reconnoissance was this day made by a large Union force under the command of General Stahel, to Upperville, Paris, Ashby’s Gap, Snickersville, Berryville, etc.—(Doc. 50.)

—An expedition consisting of five thousand infantry and two thousand cavalry, under the command of General A. P. Hovey, yesterday left Helena, Ark., and to-day arrived at Delta, Miss., for the purpose of cutting the road and telegraph wires, on the Tennessee and Mississippi railroads, and creating a panic in the rebel forces under General Price. Bridges on both roads were destroyed, together with two locomotives and thirty or forty freight-cars.—The cavalry under General Washburne had several skirmishes with General Price’s rear-guard, the main body of whose army being in full retreat to the Big Black River, driving them and capturing about fifty prisoners. The expedition was considered to be very successful.—New-Albany Ledger.

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Downing’s Civil War Diary.–Alexander G. Downing.

Diary of Alexander G. Downing; Company E, Eleventh Iowa Infantry

Thursday, 27th—I signed the allotment roll for my father to draw $10.00 of my pay at home. The division received orders to be ready to march tomorrow morning. We are to pack our extra clothing in our knapsacks, which are to be stored at La Grange. Our tents are to be taken with us, the quartermaster delivering them to us every night so that we will not have to lie out in all kinds of weather.

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