An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones.

An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 6th Battery, Wisconsin Artillery.

La Grange, Tenn., Monday, Nov. 17. Awoke to hear the rain pattering briskly on the Sibley [tent] above me. We were called out, and with expectations to march, we drew three days’ rations in our haversacks. 8 A. M. the rain cleared off, and the column of infantry began to move by on the road leading to Holly Springs. At 9 A. M. we fell in rear of column. We marched west about three quarters of a mile, then turned north toward La Grange; travelled through very pretty country. We halted at Wolf River to water our horses, fill our canteens and ate a dinner of hard crackers and sugar. Ascended a steep hill, half a mile in length, on the top of which was situated La Grange, when we turned westward and travelled until 7 P. M. Encamped on a hill. Killed a beef for supper.

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Rebel War Clerk

A Rebel War Clerk’s Diary at the Confederate States Capital, By John Beauchamp Jones

NOVEMBER 17TH.—A profound sensation has been produced in the outside world, by the resignation of Mr. Randolph ; and most of the people and the press seem inclined to denounce the President, for they know not what. In this matter the President is not to blame; but the Secretary has acted either a very foolish or a very desperate part. It appears that he wrote a note in reply to the last letter of the President, stating that as no discretion was allowed him in such matters as were referred to by the President, he begged respectfully to tender his resignation. The President responded, briefly, that inasmuch as the Secretary declined acting any longer as one of his constitutional advisers, and also declined a personal conference, no alternative remained but to accept his resignation.

Randolph’s friends would make it appear that he resigned in consequence of being restricted in his action but he knows very well that the latitude allowed him became less and less circumscribed; and that, hitherto, he was well content to operate within the prescribed limits: Therefore, if it was not a silly caprice, it was a deliberate purpose, to escape a cloud of odium he knew must sooner or later burst around him.

A letter from Gen. Magruder, dated 10th inst., at Jackson, Mississippi, intimates that we shall lose Holly Springs. He has also been in Mobile, and doubts whether that city can be successfully defended by Gen. Forney, whose liver is diseased, and memory impaired. He recommends that Brig.-Gen. Whiting be promoted, and assigned to the command in place of Forney, relieved.

A letter from Gen. Whiting, near Wilmington, dated 13th. inst., expresses serious apprehensions whether that place can be held against a determined attack, unless a supporting force of 10,000 men be sent there immediately. It is in the command of Major-Gen. G. A. Smith.

More propositions to ship cotton in exchange for the supplies needed by the country. The President has no objection to accepting them all, provided the cotton don’t go to any of the enemy’s ports. How cam it be possible to avoid this liability, if the cotton be shipped from the Mississippi River?

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Shelled by battery near Fredericksburg.–Diary of Josiah Marshall Favill.

Diary of a Young Officer–Josiah Marshall Favill (57th New York Infantry)

November 17th. Towards evening came within sight of Falmouth and struck a very slight line of cavalry pickets. We got together all the mounted officers and orderlies of the brigade, and formed ourselves as a line of cavalry skirmishers, and advanced, with the infantry in rear of us, hustling the scattered rebels before us in fine style, advancing close to the high hills overlooking the little village below, where we were stopped by a shell from a rebel battery, which exploded just in front of us. The Fifty-seventh and Sixty-sixth regiments were ordered up, and directed to scale the hill, which they did in fine style, although the rebels had the exact range, and dropped several shells amongst them. Reaching the crest of the hill, the town of Fredericksburg was in full view across the river and to the left, the battery that was shelling us could be seen down by the river alongside a brick mill. The colonel sent for Captain Pettit, who soon came up with his battery, and by doubling the teams and getting many men to push, quickly ran a couple of guns up the very steep hill. We all stood around awaiting the opening fire, while the rebels industriously blazed away, hoping to drive us off, but they were disappointed, Pettit sighted the two guns himself, and the first two shells burst directly in front of the rebel guns, driving every man away from them. They subsequently tried to man the guns again, but were driven back just as before. Finally a single man came out with a rope and tried to draw the guns off, but in this too they were equally unsuccessful, and finally abandoned them altogether. In the meantime the infantry marched down, and occupied Falmouth at the base of the hills along the river bank. The river here flows over a rocky bed, and while unnavigable, is not fordable near the town. A little way up there is a dam of eight or ten feet fall perhaps, and below that the water gradually increased in depth, until in front of Fredericksburg, about a mile below, it is navigable for large boats. There were three bridges, one opposite Falmouth, and two in front of Fredericksburg, but all three are now destroyed except their blackened piers, which stand as melancholy monuments of the devastation of war.

As the pontoon train ordered to be on hand had not arrived, we could not get across, and so made preparations for an early attack the following morning, but to our surprise were directed to establish camps and picket lines.

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Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

November 17.—Mr. W. James, a member of the Twenty-seventh Mississippi Regiment, died to-day.

I find I have more than I can possibly attend to. Dr. H. has written to Mrs. Ogden, requesting her to take the hospital in charge. I do hope she will come.

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A Diary of American Events.

The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore

November 17.—Warrenton, Va., was finally evacuated by the army under General Burnside. — The Twenty-third regiment of Connecticut volunteers, under the command of Colonel Charles E. L. Holmes, arrived in New-York, en route for the seat of war.—The schooner Annie Dees was captured by the gunboat Seneca, while attempting to run the blockade of Charleston, S. C.

—At Gloucester Point, Va., an outpost picket-guard, belonging to the One Hundred and Fourth regiment of Pennsylvania, was attacked at about three o’clock this morning by a party of rebel cavalrymen, who succeeded in escaping from the National lines, after killing one of the guard, wounding three, and capturing two others. —Philadelphia Press.

—The Committee of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society in London issued an address, which they earnestly commended to the favorable consideration of their fellow-countrymen, and to the friends of humanity in all lands, with the object of evoking such an expression of sympathy as should encourage the emancipation party in the United States, in their most difficult position, to persevere in their endeavors to obtain justice for the slave.

—Jefferson Davis, at Richmond, Va., issued the following order:

Lieutenant-General T. N. Holmes, Commanding

Trans-Mississippi Department:

General: Inclosed you will find a slip from the Memphis Daily Appeal, of the third instant, containing an account, purporting to be derived from the Palmyra (Missouri) Courier, a Federal journal, of the murder of ten confederate citizens of Missouri, by order of General McNeil of the United States army.

You will communicate by flag of truce with the Federal officer commanding that department, and ascertain if the facts are as stated. If they be so, you will demand the immediate surrender of General McNeil to the confederate authorities, and, if this demand is not complied with, you will inform said commanding officer that you are ordered to execute the first ten United States officers who may be captured and fall into your hands.

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Journal of Surgeon Alfred L. Castleman.

Journal of Surgeon Alfred L Castleman.

Sunday, 16th.—What a Sunday! What a day of rest! Troops were called at 5 A. M. Carried heavy knapsacks, guns and ammunition, and march till 9 1-2 P. M.; sixteen and a half hours, and no enemy near! Truly, “Old Burney” begins vigorously; but, if this is an earnest that he means business, let him push on. His men will not complain.

This morning I got up sick, with a painful diarrhœa. Have been feeble all day, and as 9 o’clock came, with its cold and piercing winds sighing through the pines and over the hills, how longingly I looked for that “little candle,” which in times of peace was wont to “throw its beams so far” to greet me on my return to home, after a long night’s ride! How I yearned, in lonely thoughts, amidst this crowd, for the cheerful scenes and comforts which had often welcomed me on such a night. When shall I enjoy them again? When will this thirst for blood, and unholy struggle for power, yield to the love of peace and happiness at home? We passed Cattlett’s Station in our march to-day, and encamped for the night near Weaversville, with orders to continue our march at 6 o’clock to-morrow morning.

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Robert M. Magill—Personal Reminiscences of a Confederate Soldier Boy.

Robert M. Magill—Personal Reminiscences of a Confederate Soldier Boy, 39th Georgia Regiment of Infantry

Sunday, 16th.—Our regiment of our brigade left on train for Middle Tennessee. 39th ordered to cook four days’ rations and be ready to move at any time.

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A Confederate Girl’s Diary

A Confederate Girl’s Diary by Sarah Morgan Dawson

November 16th.

I was interrupted yesterday morning by Mrs. Badger, who wished to apply a few dry cups to my back, to which I quietly submitted, and was unable to move afterwards without pain, as a reward for my patience. But towards sunset came two dear letters that made me forget what I had suffered, one from George, and one from Jimmy, dated Bermudas. For the first time I know what my dear little brother suffered during those long months when we could not hear if he were dead or alive. He kept the secret until he no longer needed either friends or money; and now he tells it with a simplicity that made me cry fit to break my heart when I was left alone in the twilight with no one to see. . . . George comforts me with hopes of Peace, and a speedy return. If it could only be!. . .

This morning the boom of Yankee guns reached my ears; a sound I had hoped never to hear again. It is only those poor devils (I can afford to pity them in their fallen state) banging away at some treasonable sugar-houses that are disobedient enough to grind cane on the other side of the river. I hear that one is at Mrs. Cain’s. The sound made my heart throb. What if the fight should come off before I can walk? It takes three people to raise me whenever it is necessary for me to move; I am worse than helpless.

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For the Southern Confederacy

Civil War

Southern Confederacy (Atlanta, Georgia), November 16, 1862

Bridgeport, Ala., }

. . . The country lying between here and Sequitchie (sic) Valley, is filled with bushwhackers, whose deeds of horror make the blood curdle in one’s veins. They are principally composed of those who have fled from their homes to avoid conscription.Yet, friend and foe share the same fate as their only desire seems to be to pillage.Gen. Helm, the commandant of the Post at Chattanooga, is taking active measures to drive them out, and render travel safe once more. Many urge the destruction of every habitation and grain field in that region, as the surest and most expeditious method of ridding the country of these Thugs, but from what I know of Gen. Helm, he will be the last man thus to entail untold misery upon the innocent as well as the guilty.

Every day large numbers of exiles from Kentucky and Middle Tennessee pass by here on their way to Georgia and Alabama, they are allowed to leave upon parole.The Federals say that they now have that country and do not care to have traitors among them. . . .

Guilburton.

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Downing’s Civil War Diary.–Alexander G. Downing.

Diary of Alexander G. Downing; Company E, Eleventh Iowa Infantry

Sunday, 16th—We had another heavy rain today which caused Scott creek to overflow and our camp was almost flooded over. It seems that we shall have to move the camp.

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Reminiscences of the Civil War by William and Adelia Lyon.

Reminiscences of the Civil War, William and Adelia Lyon

To Mrs. Lyon.

Fort Henry, Tenn., Sunday, Nov. 16, 1862.—My letters recently have been few and hurried. I am now able to give you a more full account of our expedition. I have a feeling of quiet in my comfortable tent, with the rain falling outside. My round of duty is ceaseless, yet it is no burden to me, for I have the cordial co-operation of officers and men, all of whom seem to have a sincere respect for me. In addition to my regimental duties, I am commander of this post, which adds somewhat to my labors. I like Colonel Lowe, the commander of this district, well, and we get along together first rate. He compliments me very highly upon the improved condition of this regiment since I assumed the command of it. He lives on the steamer Ewing, spending most of his time at Fort Heiman over the river opposite. Now for our march.

We went down the river forty miles to Chaudet’s Landing, October 31. Thence we marched southeast to Canton on the Cumberland river, in Trigg county, Kentucky; thence southeast to La Fayette; thence northeast to Hopkinsville, Christian county, Kentucky; thence south to Garretsburg, near the line of Tennessee, and all about that place. Here we overtook Woodward’s gang, fought, and drove them; were only under fire a short time. We then went back to Hopkinsville, getting there Friday afternoon, the 7th; stayed there until Sunday afternoon; came back here by La Fayette and Fort Donelson.

The country about Hopkinsville is very fine, and Hopkinsville is a beautiful place and very healthy. It is the most loyal town we have found, having furnished a large number of troops for the Union army. It is the home of General Jackson, who was killed at the battle of Perryville. We, the officers, enjoyed largely the hospitality of the citizens and found much refinement amongst them. We were the heroes of the battle of Garretsburg, you know, and that is a great event with these people! I attended church in Hopkinsville last Sunday morning and heard a fine discourse from the Rev. Dr. Nevins, a Presbyterian, and a sterling Union man. The people in that region have suffered terribly from the raids of guerilla parties; and after witnessing the effects of this war there, and, indeed, everywhere in the South, I am more and more thankful that you are out of the range of these sufferings and that I can bear the whole peril for all of us.

I expect that Colonel Lowe will start another expedition soon after a guerilla gang under Napier, some fifty miles south of us; and we shall doubtless form a part of it. When I get back from that trip I think I can give you marching orders to come here, for it really looks as though we should winter here.

Lieut.-Col. Chapman and Captain Woodman of the Thirteenth started North yesterday, and both of them partly promised to visit you before they return. They live in Green county. The captain is a young married man and a finished gentleman. He and Colonel Chapman are among my very best friends. I am sure you will enjoy a visit from them. Several officers will send for their wives, I think, after we return from the proposed expedition; among them Captain Ruger, of Janesville. We will arrange to have you come with them.

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War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

Sunday, 16th. It commenced raining early and kept it up all day. Felt weak and miserable. Still did my duties as sergeant Maj. Some seventy odd contrabands came in from Indian Territory—Creeks. A good many had arms. They had a skirmish with bushwhackers. Seven of their men killed.

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An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones.

An Artilleryman’s Diary–Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 6th Battery, Wisconsin Artillery.

Davis Mills, Sunday, Nov. 16. 10 A. M. we had a general inspection by U. S. Grant and General Quinby of the 3rd Division.

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Rebel War Clerk

A Rebel War Clerk’s Diary at the Confederate States Capital, By John Beauchamp Jones

NOVEMBER 16TH, SUNDAY.—Yesterday the Secretary of War resigned his office, and his resignation was promptly accepted by the President.

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Movement to Fredericksburg.–Diary of Josiah Marshall Favill.

Diary of a Young Officer–Josiah Marshall Favill (57th New York Infantry)

November 16th. Fell in as usual at break of day, but broke ranks afterwards and prepared breakfast leisurely, and about eight o’clock continued the march now known to be to Frederickburg, which we hope to carry by surprise. The movement is intended to substitute the Potomac river, Acquia creek and the short overland route, to Fredericksburg, as base of supplies, in place of the Manassas route, which is more hazardous. Made a short march and went into bivouac in the open country.

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Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Sunday, November 16.—I called on Mrs. Newsom this morning, and found her cooking dinner, for about fifty men, on a small grate; she had to cook one article at a time. Mrs. N. was in distress on account of news she had just received from her home, in Arkansas. Her father, a Baptist minister, had been imprisoned and otherwise harshly treated, because he would not take the oath of allegiance to the United States government. I met a lady there, who had come to see her brother, and found him dead; she was in mourning for her husband, who died recently. Mr. Williams was holding service in the dining-room; it was filled with soldiers.

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A Diary of American Events.

The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore

November 16. — The remaining corps of the army of the Potomac, which had been encamped around Warrenton, with the exception of the Fifth corps, and the cavalry under the command of General Pleasanton, followed in the advance on Fredericksburgh.—President Lincoln issued an order respecting the observance of the Sabbath-day in the army and navy.—(Doc. 32.)

—The advance of General Sill’s brigade had a skirmish with a party of rebel cavalry on the Murfreesboro road, seven miles from Nashville, Tenn., without any loss.

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November – Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott in War Time

Thirty years old. Decided to go to Washington as nurse if I could find a place. Help needed, and I love nursing, and must let out my pent-up energy in some new way. Winter is always a hard and a dull time, and if I am away there is one less to feed and warm and worry over.

I want new experiences, and am sure to get ’em if I go. So I’ve sent in my name, and bide my time writing tales, to leave all snug behind me, and mending up my old clothes,–for nurses don’t need nice things, thank Heaven!

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Journal of Surgeon Alfred L. Castleman.

Journal of Surgeon Alfred L Castleman.

15th.—Another beautiful day; no move. Heavy cannonading this forenoon, in the direction of Warrenton. At 2 P. M. received orders to march to-morrow. Where to?

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Shoes for Our Soldiers.

Civil War

Charleston Mercury, November 15, 1862

The Richmond Whig, in noticing the fact that the winter is opening in Virginia with unexampled severity, makes a touching appeal to the humanity and patriotism of the people of the South in behalf of our shoeless soldiers. It is terrible to think that hundredsnay, thousandsof our brave troopsour sons and brothers and friendswho are suffering that we may be comfortableare in this bitter weather without the comforts of negros (sic), of paupers, or even of convicts in the penitentiaryare literally barefooted in the snow. Shame, shame on those who have failed to prevent this, and on those who now permit it! There is something more important and pressing for the people now to do than sit in judgment on delinquent officials, and that is, to do what they can to supply the neglects of their public agents. The condition of the army is heart-rending. The people must come to the rescue. Men who have fought and suffered as they have done, must not be neglected by those who stay at home. Let each citizen resolve, the moment he reads this, to furnish one or more pairs of shoes; or, if they cannot be had, something else that will serve to shield a soldier from suffering. If you haven’t it, buy it, no matter at what price, if you can pay for it; for it is better to fill the pockets even of the most heartless speculator, than that this disgraceful condition of things should continue an hour.

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“The more I think about the matter, the surer I am that we won’t do much before next May.”–Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, Charles Wright Wills.

Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, Charles Wright Wills, (8th Illinois Infantry)

Camp at Lagrange, Tenn., November 15, 1862.

We’re having more of a rest here than we anticipated when we arrived. Suppose that the organizing of the army into divisions and brigades delays us some; and, maybe, the change of commanders in the Potomac army has something to do with it. Or possibly we’re waiting for McClernand to move from Memphis. I don’t think our army here (the Corinth and Bolivar forces) is very large, though some estimate it quite strong, as much as 50,000 or 60,000. I think we have about 35,000, maybe less. General Lanman has been relieved from command of our division by General McKean and ordered to Memphis. Am sorry to lose him. He has few equals for skill in handling a division or honor and courage as a soldier. Am much afraid that the rainy season will catch us in the midst of our slow motions, and then good bye all hopes of the war’s closing next spring. McPherson and Logan promised in speeches a few days since that we would finish up the business within 40 days; and I believe we can, West of Georgia, if this weather will continue and our commanders will improve it. Don’t believe that Price will dare to fight us anywhere, certainly not this side of Jackson. We can’t have more than 40 days’ of marching weather yet until the rains come, and in that time we ought at least to make 250 miles. The more I think about the matter, the surer I am that we won’t do much before next May. Well, I enjoy soldiering and can stand the delay in proportion; but inactivity when a fellow can’t see the reason therefor, is provoking to a degree extensive. We made a capital start from Peoria to this place in five days, but the thing hasn’t been followed up. Our cavalry has been doing some dashing work here, sums up about 300 prisoners, etc. But the 7th hasn’t figured much therein, at least not in reports, although the 7th boys say they did their share. I have seen all my acquaintances in the 7th, and the 8th Infantry is also here. Fred Norcott and Milo are both looking splendidly. Also Ben Rockhold. ‘Tis said that General Logan publicly disgraced the 17th to-day for some insult to himself. Never thought much of that 17th and think less now than ever before. They certainly show no signs of discipline that can be seen by the naked eye. The 7th Kansas Cavalry, ’tis said, proposed in writing to General Grant, that if he would give them a certain time, (no other condition), they would capture or kill General Price. I wish he’d do it. They would raise the d—l around the Rebel army, and I believe it practicable at any time for 500 daring men to reach the person of any of our commanders, and why not theirs. They are cutting our baggage down to a very small compass, so that six wagons can haul for ten companies. I’m opposed to it, but Halleck ranks me and I will have to submit. Nobody in this country seems to care a cuss whether McClellan is removed or not. General feeling is that the Potomac Army is only good to draw greenbacks and occupy winter quarters. We’re in hopes that Pope will be sent back to us after he finishes hanging those Indians. I don’t believe there is a regiment in this army that would not cheer him as its corps commander. Everybody seems to be willing to bet something on Pope. Hurlbut is the most popular man here as a division commander, and I think that Grant could get more votes than any other man for commander of the army, always excepting Rosy. Grant is not so popular among the general officers, as far as I know, but the whole line believe in him, mostly, because he is for going ahead and will fight his men. The Memphis force hasn’t moved yet that I can hear of. Everything goes on swimmingly in the 103d. The old regiments try to bore our boys by calling them conscripts and $40 men, but don’t succeed well. In a march of 15 miles last week an old regiment, 3d Iowa, tried to run us down but it ended in our marching right through them. Dorrance is an excellent fellow in the field, wouldn’t trade him for any other lieutenant in the regiment. The Democratic victories at the polls don’t excite anyone here. We only wish the soldiers could vote. Illinois would talk differently if we could.

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Three Years in the Confederate Horse Artillery — George Michael Neese.

Three Years in the Confederate Horse Artillery — George Michael Neese.

November 15 — Renewed our march at sunrise. This morning when we forded the Shenandoah, General Ewell’s infantry crossed the river to the east side. We were on the move all day and are camped this evening in Clarke County, little below White Post.

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A Confederate Girl’s Diary

A Confederate Girl’s Diary by Sarah Morgan Dawson

Saturday, November 15th.

I think I grow no better rapidly. .Fortunately on Wednesday night they succeeded in turning me over; for my poor elbows, having lost all their skin, were completely used up. Now, if I go slowly and carefully, I can turn myself at the cost of some little suffering. . . .

Yesterday Colonel Steadman, of the First Alabama, called with his father. He sent me many messages of condolence, and the rather unpleasant advice to be cupped and scarified. His profession was that of a physician before he became colonel. His surgeon, whose name is Madding, told him he was satisfied that I was seriously injured, though I had not complained. The Colonel is the same who called when we were in Clinton. They readily accepted our invitation to dinner, and remained until late in the afternoon, when Captain Bradford came in. More messages of condolence and sympathy upstairs, which produced no visible effect on my spine, though very comforting to the spirit.

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Downing’s Civil War Diary.–Alexander G. Downing.

Diary of Alexander G. Downing; Company E, Eleventh Iowa Infantry

Saturday, 15th—It rained all day and we had no drill. No news. We have the Sibley tents now and are in good shape for cold weather. The tents are large, one accommodating eighteen or twenty men, and it is supported by a center pole which rests on a tripod. Fires are built on the ground floor in the center and there is a round hole at the top of the tent for the smoke to escape. The men sleep in Indian fashion with their feet to the fire.

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War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

War Diary of Luman Harris Tenney.

Saturday, 15th. Alarm at 4. Saddled and packed up. At nine in line on account of firing heard. Proved to be Capt. Greenough fighting a scouting party. Enemy moved camp about a mile to the prairie west, a little nearer the other brigades. I still felt pretty bad—another slight chill. Lay down by fire but could not keep warm. Fever some worse in the night.

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