Diary of a Young Officer–Josiah Marshall Favill (57th New York Infantry)

October 16th. The rebel General Stuart crossed the Potomac on the 10th above Williamsport, and has made a most successful raid entirely around our army, recrossing in safety near the Monocacy. He has destroyed immense quantities of material, besides refitting his command, and captured horses enough to nearly remount it, and the country is in [...]

0 comments

October 10th. The army is still enjoying a rest, and has refitted, and barring additions to our ranks, is in as fine condition as ever. The newspapers are getting anxious about another campaign, and it does look as though we were wasting valuable time, although none of us is particularly anxious for another fight. A [...]

0 comments

September 28th. Excellent weather. Nothing of importance to relate. Our tents are pitched, and we are living in luxury and abundance, drilling, and making as much as possible out of what is left to us. McKim is in charge of the division hospital in a large brick house, and is gaining much reputation for industry, [...]

0 comments

September 27th. The camp looks lonesome in the absence of so many familiar faces. If we could only get substitutes to take the places of those constantly dropping out through the casualties of war that would be some compensation, but as it is there is only a void, and the result is a general apathy, [...]

0 comments

[September 23d] From Bolivar Heights, on which our camp is pitched, we have a magnificent view of the Shenandoah valley, limited only by the distant horizon. Immediately across the river are the Loudon Heights, and there, perched up well in the clouds, are several batteries and a large force of infantry. The place is of [...]

0 comments

[September 20] General Lee conducted his retreat with much skill, crossing the Potomac, and saving all his material with little or no loss. Our victory, considering the immense interests at stake, is certainly of the very utmost importance. The invading hosts have quickly been driven back to their piney forests, lifting an immense load from [...]

0 comments

[September 19th] At eight o'clock the next morning, the 19th, the men on the skirmish line, suspecting by the stillness in front that something was up, advanced and found the enemy gone. Immediately the men stood up and all was excitement. The commanding general was notified and promptly ordered Porter's corps in pursuit, while our [...]

0 comments

September 16th, Tuesday. Fell in at daylight but remained in position, much to the surprise of everybody. Shortly afterwards an artillery duel commenced, which continued throughout the day. The enemy have an immense number of guns in position, apparently more than we have, and are liberal in the expenditure of ammunition. So far as our [...]

0 comments

September 5th. Thursday morning, mounted guard in presence of a large crowd, including many ladies in carriages. Throughout the day hosts of people flocked about the camps, all very friendly, including one charming group of school girls, who, to us, were as the first appearance of the sun to the Northern explorer, after an arctic [...]

0 comments

UPON our return to the defenses of Washington we heard for the first time that General McClellan had been relieved from the command of the army of the Potomac, which was a great surprise to us, and caused much anxiety. There is no doubt the army feels very kindly toward the General, although our expectations [...]

0 comments

[1st] At daylight passed through Fairfax court house and went into position two miles north of it on Flint Hill, stacked arms, and got our breakfast. Just ahead of us were large bodies of troops and vast parks of wagons and artillery, all taking a rest; as we were to remain till they were gone, [...]

0 comments

[31st] The old Bull Run of 1861 was vividly before my eyes; the ground we stood upon was the identical ground occupied by the line of New Jersey troops, who gave the scattered legions of McDowell such a terrific shock. Ah, how distinctly I remember! Around, in all directions, heavy bodies of troops were massed [...]

0 comments

[August 28] Arriving at Alexandria early in the morning, we immediately disembarked and marched directly for Camp California, our first winter quarters. When the men came in sight of the old spot, they fairly yelled with delight, throwing their caps in the air, and hurrahing till half their throats were sore. The Fifty-second German regiment [...]

0 comments

August 27th. At 5 A. M. disembarked and marched up the hills, which here form a very high and steep bluff, bivouacking near the woods a short distance in rear, stacked arms and lay down; in a few minutes we were ordered back again to the docks, and on board the steamer United States, bound [...]

0 comments

August 23d. Up early and made a prompt start; half an hour afterwards it began to rain and soon poured down in torrents. We know a thing or two now about campaigning, and so a rain storm is something to enjoy, at least for mounted men; on the pommels of our saddles we carry, rolled [...]

0 comments

August 22d. Reveille at daybreak. Immediately after breakfast rations were issued, and the column stretched out en route for Newport News; the heat was oppressive, but the troops marched well; traveled over a very interesting country, with immense fields of corn, tall and beautiful, which undulated in the breeze like the waves of the ocean [...]

0 comments

August 21st. Marched bright and early, arriving at Yorktown about noon and put up our tents on the identical spot occupied by us while awaiting shipment to West Point, in the spring; felt quite at home. As soon as the camp was established, all hands were dismissed for a swim, and the waves were quickly [...]

0 comments
1 2 3 6 7