Diary of a Young Officer–Josiah Marshall Favill (57th New York Infantry)

April 20th, Sunday morning. It is just one year ago today since I marched down Broadway as one of the Seventy-first regiment, enlisted for three months to put down the rebellion, and here it is stronger and more defiant than ever. How rapidly the year has passed, and how little we have done. So far [...]

0 comments

April 18th. At twelve o'clock last night we were suddenly routed out by a heavy cannonading and musketry, apparently in our front. As we always sleep here fully accoutred, we had nothing to do but grasp our arms and rush for the color line. Stood in line about an hour, watching the beautiful effect of [...]

0 comments

April 16th. Had a fine night's sleep, due to the luxury of a soft bed Seth made for me, out of pine needles stripped from the branches; glorious morning; in fact, the weather is enchanting, although yet early spring. After breakfast, sat in the open air in my shirt sleeves at the desk, making various [...]

0 comments

April 12th. Another delightful morning: Continuous streams of troops still arriving and marching to the front. Stores and guns too, are landing now, and the siege train is getting ready for its terrible work. Detailed four hundred and fifty men for fatigue duty in the trenches before Yorktown, with Captain La Valley to command them. [...]

0 comments

April 9th. Captain Fiske returned to-day from sick leave, and resumed his duties of adjutant general. The general, in relieving me, complimented me gracefully on the performance of my duties, and told me not to forget to call upon him. I returned to the regiment, and resumed the duties of regimental adjutant. Neither Seth nor [...]

0 comments

April 6th. Arrived towards evening off Fortress Monroe, and came to an anchor amidst an immense fleet of transports loaded down with troops. The following morning, the 7th, we weighed anchor, and with the fleet, steamed to Ship Point, on the northern side of the Peninsula, between the York and James rivers, ran in shore [...]

0 comments

(April 3rd) On the 25th, we marched to Warrenton Junction, meeting with no resistance, the cavalry alone doing a little skirmishing. Blenker's division of Germans marched with us, and appeared to be a bad lot of fellows, without order or discipline; they spread all over the country, capturing everything within their reach. They loaded themselves [...]

0 comments

Mount Jackson, Wednesday, March 26, 1862. The robins on the trees around me sing merrily this morning, as if this part of the world was enjoying its usual quiet, and the soldiers are laughing and talking as cheerfully as if apprehension of danger and alarm for the future was the last of their thoughts. Since [...]

0 comments

Manassas Junction, March 18, 1862. Lieutenant J. M. Favill, A. A. A. General, Sir: On the 14th instant, about 9:30 A. M., this regiment marched with a brigade of cavalry, all under the command of Brigadier-General George Stoneman, via the Orange and Alexandria railroad to Cedar Run. The march was rendered somewhat tedious and difficult [...]

0 comments

(March 18th) I occupied the rebel adjutant general's office, which was a large, long, log house, with a good fireplace in one end of it, shingle roof, and board door. The roof leaked a good deal, but otherwise the place was very comfortable. We found it strewn with reports, letters, and returns, and picked up [...]

0 comments

(March 16, 1862) On the 14th the cavalry, accompanied by the Fifty-seventh, started along the Orange and Alexandria railroad to Cedar Run. They had a brush with the enemy's pickets in the evening near Cedar Run, driving them off the ground. On the 15th the infantry advanced to Catlett's Station, where they exchanged shots for [...]

0 comments
1 2 3