Civil War

July 9, 1862, The Charleston Mercury Troops, unless healthy, are a useless expense to the country. Their physical condition is no less important than their discipline, drill or spirit. Our soldiers have the spirit, and can get the discipline and drill only from their officers. But the people of Charleston can be of great benefit [...]

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December 26, 1861, Arkansas True Democrat Little Rock A preacher presented a revolver to a soldier before his departure to the seat of war with the following injunction: If you get in a tight place and have to use it, ask God’s blessings if you have time, but be sure and not let your enemy [...]

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December 6, 1861, Richmond Enquirer One of the greatest present needs of the Confederacy is a Rolling Mill for making sheet iron and copper, boiler plates, &c. &c. Bars and rods we can make, but not a joint of stove pipe even can be rolled South of the Potomac. The latter article has gone up [...]

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Daily Times [Leavenworth, Ks], October 26, 1861 Our South-Eastern Border. Every day the necessity becomes more apparent for sending troops along the line between our State and Missouri. Marauding parties are almost constantly scouting along the border, sacking and burning our infant towns, and committing depredations among the inhabitants. The Kansas Brigade, which has so [...]

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Warsaw, October 21st. Four days we have been waiting for the building of the bridge. By night and by day the work goes on, and now the long black shape is striding slowly across the stream. In a few hours it will have gained the opposite bank, and then, Ho, for Springfield! Our scouts have [...]

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Daily Times [Leavenworth, Ks], September 17, 1861 Leavenworth, Sept. 16, 1861. At a meeting of the Committee of Safety, the following resolutions were passed and ordered to be published: Resolved, That this committee disapprove of, and denounce ";" and that they will do all in their power to prevent it; and, in this regard, they [...]

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by John Beauchamp Jones SEPTEMBER 17TH.—A man from Washington came into my office to-day, saying he had important information from Washington. I went into the Secretary’s room, and found Mr. Benjamin surrounded by a large circle of visitors, all standing hat in hand, and quite silent. I asked him if he would see the gentleman [...]

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September 1, 1862, Tri-Weekly Telegraph (Houston) There are in this State about two thousand wheat growers. The crop this season is a plentiful one, and yet flour is worth $30 per barrel. Now, with all due respect—which simply means our own interests considered—we propose to drop wheat-raisers, wheat-grinders, and wheat-ground sellers, for the present altogether. [...]

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August 8.—This evening, at Baltimore, Md., Charles King, from North Carolina, was arrested by officer Stevens, of the Southern District, by order of Major-General Dix, on the charge of being concerned in the raising of a number of men, whoso purpose it was to organize themselves into a crew, and take passage on some boat, [...]

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August 6, 1862, Daily Times (Leavenworth, Kansas) War for the Union! and for Freedom for All. 1000 Colored Men Wanted for the 1st K. R. of the Liberating Army.             All able bodied colored men, between the age of eighteen and forty-five, can now have an opportunity of voluntarily enrolling their names in this regiment. [...]

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Bellville [Tx] Countryman, July 31, 1861 The citizens of Port Lavaca, says the Victoria Advocate, have established a foundry for casting cannon, and also procured machinery for the manufacture of small arms. An old nine pounder, long located in Victoria, has been sent down there to be rifled. The Reagan Guards and Texas Guards, from [...]

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July 31, 1862, The Charleston Mercury The following recipe for flesh wounds has proved very efficacious, and is recommended to the Medical Faculty as an experiment. It has been practically tested by an officer in the French army, who was wounded in the arm, and in the space of eight days his wound was healed. [...]

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Arkansas True Democrat [Little Rock], July 25, 1861 From our own Correspondent. Richmond, July 9th, 1861. Notwithstanding the oppressively warm weather, the city of Richmond presents a stirring and lively appearance. There is great activity in the various departments of the newly formed government, particularly those of the war and navy, and their subordinate branches, [...]

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May 14, 1862, The New York Herald Our Army Correspondence. WEST POINT, Va., May 8, 1862. I have gathered the following details of a most desperate engagement at this point yesterday:- After the landing of General Franklin’s division, which camped in a large field, surrounded on the south, west and north by a dense wood, [...]

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May 1, 1861; The New York Herald A crisis is approaching in the military movements progressing at the seat of war. Troops have not been concentrating there for so many days without a definite object, and it is manifest now what the purpose of government is. Baltimore is to be completely filled with troops, and [...]

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May 1, 1861; Memphis Daily Appeal (Tennessee) The Montgomery papers announce the fact that two negroes there had subscribed liberally to the Confederate loan—$200 each. The Gainesville niggers are not behind. Mr. T. D. Bell's Henry (Henry says he was raised by Mr. Davenport, of Northumberland County, Va.) and Mr. R. G. McMahon's "Jim Cotton" [...]

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April 30, 1861; Daily Times (Leavenworth, KS) Companies E and F, Capts. Steele and Sully, arrived at the Fort, yesterday, from Kearney. There are about 170 men in the two companies, and Col. Miles is the commanding officer. The volunteers from this city, stationed at the Fort, will now probably be relieved from duty there.

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