Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

Sunday, October 26.—On looking out of the window this morning, I saw that snow had fallen heavily through the night. The first thing I thought of was a few lines of an old Scotch song:

“A’ the hills are covered wi’ snow;

It’s surely winter fairly.”

Lookout, and the adjoining hills and valleys, arrayed in their snowy attire, looked really beautiful. I should have enjoyed the scene but for the knowledge of what our men were suffering—our half-clad soldiers.

“——Wheresoe’er they are,

That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,

How shall their houseless heads and unfed sides,

Their loop’d and window’d raggedness, defend them

From seasons such as these?”

 

It is said the army is very much demoralized by the retreat from Kentucky; but, I trust, when they get rested, all will be right again.

Dr. H. has written to one of the ladies of the Military Aid Society in Mobile, to sec if she can not send us some bedding, as we have scarcely any.

Last night one of my patients died. His sufferings were so great it was a relief to see him go; he was entirely covered with erysipelas. He seemed well prepared for the change. His name was Newbern— was a member of the Thirty-second Alabama Regiment, and was from Citronelle, Miss.


Kate Cumming: A Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

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