Civil War

The Alabama state convention received Commissioner from South Carolina. North Carolina Senate bill arming the State passed the North Carolina House: yeas 73, neas 26. The Virginia state legislature passed anti-coercion resolution. Jacob Thompson , Buchanan’s Secretary of the Interior, went to Raleigh, to persuade the North Carolina Legislature to vote for secession, November 18, [...]

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January 8, 1861, The New York Herald The rumors which prevailed in this city on Sunday last that there was in the wind’s about Governor’s Island, were the cause of great excitement and public concern. The report, which it now appears was not altogether unfounded, was to the effect that a considerable body of federal [...]

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January 8, 1861, The New York Herald WASHINGTON, Jan. 5, 1861. Among the causes of the prevailing excitement may justly be designated, as one of the most productive, the telegraphic correspondence from the seceding States. Much of this may be quite correct, but a very great deal of it is extremely exaggerated, and not a [...]

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January 7, 1861, The New York Herald WASHINGTON, Jan. 6., 1861 The President, in submitting the correspondence with the South Carolina Commissioners to Congress tomorrow, will accompany it with a special message, setting forth the condition of affairs in South Carolina and other Southern States that have and are still engaged in taking possession of [...]

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January 7, 1861, The New York Herald WASHINGTON, Jan. 5, 1861. Those who are well acquainted with Major Anderson are much amused at the descriptions which are given of him by Northern papers. He seems to be thought a phlegmatic statesman rather than a soldier, and to have acted, in removing the troops under his [...]

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January 7, 1861, The Charleston Mercury THE RICHARDSON GUARD, preceded by a fine band of music, passed through our principal streets last night, and in the evolutions of their drill evinced remarkable proficiency. They proceeded to the residence of their First Lieutenant, CHAS. H. AXSON, Esq; where, in response to repeated cheers and calls, he [...]

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January 7, 1861, The Charleston Mercury THE MERCURY BULLETINS, we are proud to learn, are always looked for at all the forts and fortifications as containing the very latest and most reliable news in this great crisis. Yesterday afternoon, when copies or our special despatches from Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Alabama and Washington, reached Fort Moultrie, [...]

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January 6, 1861, The New York Herald WASHINGTON, Jan. 4, 1861. There are no facts here. An event today is nothing tomorrow, and the scene shifts every hour. The storm is tremendous; but I think it will end without desolating the country. There are many unreasonable men at both extremes - men of precipitation and [...]

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January 6, 1861, The New York Herald Honest Old Abe Lincoln, whose achievements as a splitter of rails now form part of the history of the country, has latterly been engaged in a new line of business, a rather higher branch of woodwork, to wit: - the manufacturing of Cabinets. There is all the difference [...]

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January 5, 1861, The New York Herald The conservative masses of the people, North as well as South, have become fairly aroused to the conviction that, in this most critical period of our nation’s history, no remedy whatever is to be looked for from their representatives in Congress. A background of incapacity, stupidity, imbecility, gross [...]

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January 5, 1861, The New York Herald The conservative masses of the people, North as well as South, have become fairly aroused to the conviction that, in this most critical period of our nation’s history, no remedy whatever is to be looked for from their representatives in Congress. A background of incapacity, stupidity, imbecility, gross [...]

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January 5, 1861, The Charleston Mercury It is our pleasing duty to record, this morning, the patriotic course of another son of South Carolina, in the resignation, some days since, of Mr. WILLIAM WILKINSON, from the Naval School at Annapolis. The opportunity of a naval education and position have thus voluntarily been abandoned from a [...]

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January 5, 1861, The Charleston Mercury We learn that P.D.J. WESTON, Esq; has presented to the Georgetown Rifle Guard, Captain E.J. WHITE, one hundred and twenty of the fine English weapon known as the ‘Enfield Rifle’ with accoutrements and ammunition ample for a long campaign, besides placing funds at the disposal of the company. The [...]

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January 5, 1861, The Charleston Mercury A detachment of the Richardson Guard, Lieut. C.H. AXSON, were out on duty Sunday afternoon. Another platoon passed the MERCURY office yesterday afternoon, under the command of Lieut. BOAG. The detachment of Citadel Cadets who have been on the seashore since the first of January, passed our office yesterday [...]

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January 4, 1861, Richmond Enquirer The rush of events is fast hurrying the final dissolution of the Confederacy; the excitement increases as despatch after despatch is made public, and subsides into deeper resentment and more determined resistance. Men ─ who a few months ago were Union men ─ soon become cooperationists, and are now the [...]

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January 4, 1861, The New York Herald The reports from the South are again of a startling character. It is announced from Georgia that the Governor of that State has seized and garrisoned with militia the forts in the harbor of Savannah, and there is reason to believe that a plan has been matured by [...]

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January 4, 1861, Richmond Enquirer This city was never before within our recollection, in such a state of excitement. The all-absorbing topic of conversation is the action of South Carolina, and on every man’s lips there is an eager cry of ‘What’s the news?’- and bulletin boards are watched for each new message, with intense [...]

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January 3, 1861, The Charleston MercuryIn the military enthusiasm now pervading our city, it is difficult to keep young men who have responsible posts of business, in which the public are concerned, at their work. The rage for volunteering or active service is so great, that we, in the MERCURY office, have had the utmost [...]

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January 3, 1861, The Charleston MercuryEvery effort of the General Government to avert its dissolution, only hastens on its fate. Major ANDERSON abandons Fort Moultrie and garrisons Fort Sumter. The President approves and the Northern press praises the achievement. The New York EVENING POST even declares that this step to coercion raises the price of [...]

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