A Diary of American Events.

October 29.—A skirmish took place on the Ridgeville road, at a point five miles distant from Petersburgh, Va., between two reconnoitring force of Union troops under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Quirk, and a detachment of the rebel General Stuart’s cavalry, resulting in a rout of the latter and the capture of sixteen of their number, with about two hundred head of cattle which the rebels were driving to their camp.—(Doc. 18.)

—Early this morning a force of Union troops under the command of Major Keenan, Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, left Purcellsville, Va., on a reconnoitring expedition. They passed through Berrysville, Snickersville, and Philomont. On arriving at Union they found that town occupied by a battalion of Georgia cavalry, whom they drove out. Here it was ascertained that General Walker, in command of a force of South-Carolina troops, was in position five miles from Middleburgh. Major Keenan also found about a hundred wounded rebel soldiers, all of whom he paroled, and learned that General Longstreet was in command of the rebel forces near Upperville. He next proceeded to Aldie, in the vicinity of which place he unexpectedly came upon a detachment of the First Michigan cavalry, sent out by General Sigel from his command near Centreville. Major Keenan then returned to Purcellsville, having marched thirty-five miles, and obtained some valuable information.

—The brig Baron de Castine, of Boston, Captain Saunders, was this day captured in lat. 39°, long. 69°, by the rebel privateer Alabama, and liberated on a bond for six thousand dollars.

—The ship Alleganian, of New-York, was boarded at night while at anchor off the mouth of the Rappahannock, by a party of rebels, who, after riding her, and taking off the crew, set her on fire. The U. S. steamer Crusader subsequently came up, and endeavored to extinguish the flames, but without success.

—A fight took place near Butler, Bates County, Missouri, between a detachment of the First Kansas colored volunteers, under the command of Colonel Seaman, and a body of rebel guerrillas under Cockerill, resulting in a repulse of the latter with a loss of about thirty killed and wounded. The Unionists had eight men killed and ten wounded.—(Doc. 19.)


The Rebellion Record—A Diary of American Events; by Frank Moore
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