April 21.—The United States Circuit Court, for the middle district of Tennessee, held its first (preliminary) session, since the secession of the State, in the court-room of the capital at Nashville, Judge John Catron presiding.—Chicago Times.

—The Provost-Marshal’s force at Richmond, Va., arrested three citizens of that place, named Jas. Humphreys, Benj. Humphreys, watchmakers, and J. T. Pritchard, formerly a clerk of G. R. Peake, all for disloyalty. The prisoners were defiant in their remarks, saying that they owed allegiance to the United States alone, etc All three of them are Virginians by birth.—Richmond Despatch, April 22.

—Gen. Milroy, at the head of a reconnoitring force, overtook the rear-guard of the rebel cavalry six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap, Augusta County, Western Virginia. They fled, rapidly pursued by the Nationals. Milroy learned that their main body stopped the previous night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but finding they were cut off at Staunton by Gen. Banks, they bore south-west, through both Bath and Alleghany Counties, toward the James River.

A company that was sent by General Milroy down the north fork of the Potomac, in Pendleton County, captured eight rebels, including Barnett, a notorious guerrilla.—New – York Commercial, April 25.

—The ship R. C. Files was captured by the National fleet, while attempting to run the blockade of Mobile, Ala.—New-York Tribune, May 9.

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